Archive for the ‘The World’ Category

Richard Jordan had everything he was told to want: cars, a new house, and a fiancee. Then his fiancee left him. So he sold everything, bought a Lamborghini Gallardo and set out across America. This is his amazing story.

This is a love story, but not a conventional one. Sure, there’s a woman. There always is. But it’s when the woman split that the real romance began. This is the story of Richard Jordan, a man who lost love and then found it again in an exotic Italian sports car and the open American road. Jordan’s journey would take him across the country and back again multiple times as he racked up nearly 100,000 miles on a car so expensive, most owners rarely drive at all.

Independence Day

It was early 2006 and Richard’s version of the American Dream lay crumbling at his feet. After giving his girlfriend of five years a ring and a house in suburban North Texas — purchased with the proceeds from selling his business, his old house and a few of his cars — she left him.

“I bought us the house and planned on moving in and, as soon as I did, she left,” explains Richard. “So I got stuck in a house I didn’t want, in an area I didn’t want to be in… it was kind of emotionally traumatic. So I bought the car and wandered around.”

The Gallardo is named for a famous Spanish bull and unleashes a massive 512 HP through its mid-mounted V10. Its sharp looks hint at the performance: 0-to-60 mph in just 4.0 seconds with a top speed of 195 mph for the model Jordan purchased. The price? A steep $180,000 at the time of purchase.

After locating the right model and arranging the financing he picked up his black Lamborghini Gallardo Coupe from Lamborghini of Ohio. The date? July 4th, 2006.

Independence Day was an almost intentionally ironic choice, as he picked that day to separate from everything he’d created but now no longer wanted, including the house.

“I’d become a prisoner to my house, to everything, to my fantasy of an American Dream or anything I could remotely call home.”

“I’m Not Moby”

With one of the fastest cars in the world but nowhere to take it, Jordan just started driving. For more than a year he wandered from place to place, living in motels and making new friends. He’d cross the United States three times and make trips from Ohio to Colorado to Texas to North Carolina on just a night’s rest.

“It was just a feeling that I didn’t really have a home, there was no place to safely be but the Lambo. That was the one thing that felt like it worked for me.”

He visited the ghost towns and big cities and retraced childhood trips. As soon as he’d settle down somewhere he’d get the itch to move and pack up to drive somewhere else. He had trouble paying for the house in Dallas — his one remaining possession he couldn’t shake — and was burning through what cash he had to afford gas. He almost lost the house numerous times.

“I have a few hundred grand against me, I don’t like debt, but I’m used to it,” Richard says. “I’ve accumulated a lot and paid it back several times in my life.”

His wanderings yielded as much joy and humor as they did introspection and isolation, including a trip to strip club in Ohio where Richard, then 32, was mistaken for Moby by an a waitress who was convinced he was the musician because of his shaved head, glasses and fancy car.

“This girl comes up and was a waitress and she’s like ‘You’re Moby, aren’t you?’ and I said ‘I’ll be anyone you want me to be,’ and she took it as ‘I’m Moby.'”

Richard is not Moby, but he’s also not completely against accepting free bottles of champagne when offered.

“It was just ridiculous, the manager’s like kissing my butt, I maybe spent $100 the whole night and it was just really, really silly and absurd.”

“It was just like The Blues Brothers!”

I Sold Everything To Buy A Lamborghini And Drive Across The Country

Driving across the country in a Lamborghini means occasionally driving above the speed limit. Richard’s honest about his desire to go fast and has a drawer full of 53 tickets to prove it. But it wasn’t speed, exactly, that landed him in the handcuffs of an Indiana State Trooper.

Though generally jumping from hotel room to hotel room, Richard did have family responsibilities like serving as the best man in his cousin’s wedding. While en route to the wedding he was stopped for speeding but ran afoul of the Indiana State Police and suddenly found himself staring down the highway at a roadblock.

Because his car’s registration was one-day expired the troops were able to search the car and found a handgun.

“I don’t travel without guns, I’ve been in too many situations so I always carry one or two guns with me,” Richard says. “A car like that is an assault on the senses, and you could be in a decent area and just be barraged by people and you never knew who you’re dealing with.”

At first he didn’t grasp the gravity of the situation — the police thought he was moving drugs — so his calm demeanor and jokes about hating the town he was in and a general Blues Brothers schtick didn’t go over well. They kept him in the back of a squad car for four hours, eventually releasing him on his own recognizance when they realized they weren’t able to drive the car on the back of a flatbed without his help.

He eventually got the car back and the charges settled, but the whole endeavor cost him $25,000 in fines, travel, and legal fees.


Most people don’t use their expensive cars as daily drivers exactly because they’re so expensive. The highest mileage of any Lamborghini Gallardo for sale on eBay Motors is 38,835 for a 2004 model, but the majority of vehicles are below 10,000 miles.

In his trips across the country Richard managed 91,807 miles.

“I can’t afford to buy something like that and drive it on the weekend,” Richard explains. “The difference between being materialistic and not is when you use what you have.”

For him, it’s a better value to drive it given the immediate drop in value for a used Lamborghini. It’s even strange for him that others think otherwise.

“No one is concerned with anything as long as Starbucks and the mall is open. It baffles me. It overwhelms me actually. You can have something that’s as extreme as a Lamborghini — that’s perfect in a sense — and it has no value once you use it.”

All that driving does have a price and now the car has even less value. After all the hard driving and long miles, the timing chain stretched, crunching the valves and turning the car into an exotic and expensive paperweight. The car is now worth less than he owes on it and the bank refuses to grant him another loan.

“For me, it’s wasteful not to use it. That’s anything. It doesn’t matter if it’s a fucking dishwasher,” says Richard. “That’s not really socially acceptable. It’s not the way we’re programmed… most people don’t live like I do. I’d eat ramen noodles to pay for gasoline, just to avoid the monotony of being stuck in four walls.”

Considering the traumatic experience that led him to buy the car, its destruction doesn’t seem to burden him too much.

“It worked everyday, it worked like it was supposed to, it never broke down,” Richard assures me. “It exceeded all my expectations.”

He’s using his sudden lack of transportation not as the end of one journey but as the start of a new one, setting up a shop in Dallas where he plans to build custom motorcycles and superbikes. He has plans to repair the engine or swap in a new one once he can afford it, but for now it makes an interesting sculpture to show friends and prospective customers in the main room of his new office. Richard’s also met a girl, but he’s trying to take it one step at a time.

His Lamborghini may no longer run, but Richard doesn’t regret the decisions he’s made. He adopts a zen-like tone that clashes with his mohawk while explaining how lucky he was to be able to leave everything behind and experience something many fantasize about but almost no one has the balls to actually do.

“You’re never going to live up to anyone’s expectations, so you might as well live up to your own and for me that’s to be as free as you can. And if money doesn’t buy you freedom then it’s useless.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Good job, achieved in only 11 short years.

I don’t know about you but I’d like to take a vuvuzela and smack someone upside the head with it. They are so annoying that BBC is considering a buzz-free broadcast of future games. We get it — you like blowing things. Now stop.

Or perhaps we can chip in and get all these chicks and their friends scattered throughout the stadium to distract these horny guys. See what I did there? Heh heh But how to get them to stop? How about more hottie soccer fans like this one?

This, my friends (no hard feelings) is too big for you.

A survey of more than 1,000 men in India has concluded that condoms made according to international sizes are too large for a majority of Indian men.

The study found that more than half of the men measured had penises that were shorter than international standards for condoms.

It has led to a call for condoms of mixed sizes to be made more widely available in India.

The two-year study was carried out by the Indian Council of Medical Research.

Over 1,200 volunteers from the length and breadth of the country had their penises measured precisely, down to the last millimetre.

The scientists even checked their sample was representative of India as a whole in terms of class, religion and urban and rural dwellers.

” It’s not size, it’s what you do with it that matters” – Sunil Mehra

The conclusion of all this scientific endeavour is that about 60% of Indian men have penises which are between three and five centimetres shorter than international standards used in condom manufacture.

Doctor Chander Puri, a specialist in reproductive health at the Indian Council of Medical Research, told the BBC there was an obvious need in India for custom-made condoms, as most of those currently on sale are too large.

The issue is serious because about one in every five times a condom is used in India it either falls off or tears, an extremely high failure rate.

And the country already has the highest number of HIV infections of any nation.

‘Not a problem’

Mr Puri said that since Indians would be embarrassed about going to a chemist to ask for smaller condoms there should be vending machines dispensing different sizes all around the country.

“Smaller condoms are on sale in India. But there is a lack of awareness that different sizes are available. There is anxiety talking about the issue. And normally one feels shy to go to a chemist’s shop and ask for a smaller size condom.”

But Indian men need not be concerned about measuring up internationally according to Sunil Mehra, the former editor of the Indian version of the men’s magazine Maxim.

“It’s not size, it’s what you do with it that matters,” he said.

“From our population, the evidence is Indians are doing pretty well.

“With apologies to the poet Alexander Pope, you could say, for inches and centimetres, let fools contend.”

It’s the holidays, we’re coming off a brutal recession, and the last thing any of us needs is a speeding ticket. And yet someone reading this — I hope not the person writing this — is going to get a speeding ticket in the next week or so. According to the National Motorists Association, between 25 million and 50 million speeding tickets are issued every year. So with that in mind, and since plenty of people get pulled over on their way to and from work, we’re offering some suggestions for talking your way out of a ticket.

Will any of this work? Your guess is as good as ours. And, of course, you can drive 90 miles an hour on the freeway and try to find out, but we don’t recommend it. At any rate, here are our suggestions, cultivated from some experts and regular folks who have managed to talk their way out of a ticket. Consider it our gift to anyone caught speeding over the holidays or in the midst of a new year.

Don’t lie. Sure, it’s understandable that you’re going to want to punt and tell the officer that your wife is in labor at the hospital waiting for you, or you’re being chased by a gang of jewel thieves determined to rub you out. But aside from the fact that lying is wrong, and honesty is the best policy and all of that, police officers are kind of trained to spot, well, you know, crooks. If you lie, they’re either going to recognize that or simply find out (“Oh, wow, sorry to hear about your wife — let me make sure you get to the hospital on time”). Instead, do what may not come naturally at a time like this and tell the truth.

That’s the approach Devra Renner, a parenting blogger, gave back when she was in college, driving from Tucson to Lubbock and was pulled over in Salt Flat, Texas. The state trooper asked Renner what she was doing “speeding through the great state of Texas.” Renner admitted that she was in the middle of nowhere, had been driving for hours, got bored and wanted to see how fast her car could go.

Maybe the officer admired that honesty, because he looked at her and said, “Darlin’, you know you’re in a Volkswagen Rabbit, not on the Nascar circuit, right?”

She agreed, apologized and told him she would “hop more slowly” from now on. The state trooper asked her to watch her speed and gave her a warning.

Drive around with something really weird in your car. We’re not really recommending this as a strategy, but it’s such an unusual story, we figured we’d offer it up. Autumn O’Bryan, from Salem, New Hampshire, has a pretty unique business. She stages sex toy home parties for women, and a few years ago, as she was leaving one such party, the hostess came running out of the house, flagging O’Bryan down. O’Bryan had left behind one of those toys.

She thanked the hostess, threw it on her passenger seat and drove away, in somewhat of a hurry to meet some girlfriends. “I was speeding and got caught in a speed trap,” says O’Bryan, who vividly recalls the officer walking up to her car with a flashlight and asking for her license and registration. “He asked where I was coming from, and why I was in such a hurry.”

O’Bryan explained that she had just finished working, and that she was on the way out to meet the girls. That’s when he flashed his light on the sex toy, and the officer then stared at O’Bryan for a long moment. Finally, he said, “Be careful and have a good night,” and walked away, shaking his head. He never even took the license or registration.

Know when to keep your mouth shut. One police officer in Virginia emailed in (he didn’t want his name used) and made the observation that “if you get the ticket, you don’t get the lecture. If you start getting the lecture, it usually means no ticket.” That would suggest that if you’re getting a lecture, it would be smart to not be defensive. Try nodding, saying, “you’re right,” and in general, being polite. Being polite to an officer of the law is a good idea in any situation, but seriously, this is not the moment to get argumentative.

COMING SOON: How to minimize the damage if you are going to get a ticket, in “How to Talk Your Way Out of a Speeding Ticket, Part II”

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Hollywood stunner Brittany Murphy, who found big screen success after her breakout role in “Clueless,” died Sunday after collapsing in the shower.

Los Angeles cops are investigating the 32-year-old’s sudden death, but a coroner official said it “appears to be natural.”

An autopsy is pending – over the objections of her British screenwriter husband, Simon Monjack, who told hospital staffers he didn’t want one, according to the gossip Web site TMZ.

The screen siren and singer was in full cardiac arrest and could not be revived after her beloved mother – who told paramedics the actress was diabetic – found her unconscious in the shower, TMZ reported.

Five paramedics who arrived after the 8 a.m. 911 call feverishly administered CPR as Monjack wandered around in his pajama bottoms, a witness told RadarOnline. Murphy was pronounced dead at 10:04 a.m. at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

The troubled starlet rose to fame in 1995 as the sidekick Tai in “Clueless,” who went from awkward wallflower to snotty hottie. She has appeared in more than 25 movies since then, including 1997’s “Bongwater,” “Girl, Interrupted” in 1998, “8 Mile” and “Sin City.”

Murphy, whose gravelly voice rocked the animated film “Happy Feet,” even broke into the dance club world with the hit single “Faster Kill Pussycat.”

Murphy lived in Edison, N.J., before moving to California when she was 13 and landing her first television role in “Blossom.”

She underwent a transformation from a too-pudgy-for-Hollywood brunette to a bone-thin blond – with cleavage ample enough to land her in Maxim’s 100 hottest women in 2006.

Speculation over her weight loss haunted her for years, and in 2005, she was dropped by her agent and publicist, fanning the gossip flames. At the time, she dismissed reports that her weight was connected to drug use or an eating disorder.

“I have never tried [cocaine] in my entire life. I’ve never even seen it,” she told Jane magazine. “I am also way too high-strung . . . Can you imagine? My God. I think my heart would explode.”

Friends openly worried that she’d become addicted to the prescription painkiller Vicodin after undergoing plastic surgery.

“Brittany has been living life on the edge,” one source told Britain’s Daily Mail.

She was set to play a small role in Sylvester Stallone’s upcoming film “The Expendables,” due out in August. But she had been mainly reduced to low-budget indie flicks, including “Across the Hall,” which opened two weeks ago in only two theaters.

Earlier this month, she abruptly left the Puerto Rico set of “The Caller” amid reports she’d been fired. Her publicist called it “creative differences.”

Sunday, Twitter was abuzz with tributes from stars, including an old squeeze, Ashton Kutcher, her co-star in 2003’s “Just Married.” “See you on the other side kid,” Kutcher tweeted.

Screenwriter and director Kevin Smith referred to her oft-quoted line in “Clueless”: “Sad to hear about Brittany Murphy. G’night, Ms. Murphy; hope you’re rollin’ with the homies someplace nice.”