Archive for the ‘People’ Category

Richard Jordan had everything he was told to want: cars, a new house, and a fiancee. Then his fiancee left him. So he sold everything, bought a Lamborghini Gallardo and set out across America. This is his amazing story.

This is a love story, but not a conventional one. Sure, there’s a woman. There always is. But it’s when the woman split that the real romance began. This is the story of Richard Jordan, a man who lost love and then found it again in an exotic Italian sports car and the open American road. Jordan’s journey would take him across the country and back again multiple times as he racked up nearly 100,000 miles on a car so expensive, most owners rarely drive at all.

Independence Day

It was early 2006 and Richard’s version of the American Dream lay crumbling at his feet. After giving his girlfriend of five years a ring and a house in suburban North Texas — purchased with the proceeds from selling his business, his old house and a few of his cars — she left him.

“I bought us the house and planned on moving in and, as soon as I did, she left,” explains Richard. “So I got stuck in a house I didn’t want, in an area I didn’t want to be in… it was kind of emotionally traumatic. So I bought the car and wandered around.”

The Gallardo is named for a famous Spanish bull and unleashes a massive 512 HP through its mid-mounted V10. Its sharp looks hint at the performance: 0-to-60 mph in just 4.0 seconds with a top speed of 195 mph for the model Jordan purchased. The price? A steep $180,000 at the time of purchase.

After locating the right model and arranging the financing he picked up his black Lamborghini Gallardo Coupe from Lamborghini of Ohio. The date? July 4th, 2006.

Independence Day was an almost intentionally ironic choice, as he picked that day to separate from everything he’d created but now no longer wanted, including the house.

“I’d become a prisoner to my house, to everything, to my fantasy of an American Dream or anything I could remotely call home.”

“I’m Not Moby”

With one of the fastest cars in the world but nowhere to take it, Jordan just started driving. For more than a year he wandered from place to place, living in motels and making new friends. He’d cross the United States three times and make trips from Ohio to Colorado to Texas to North Carolina on just a night’s rest.

“It was just a feeling that I didn’t really have a home, there was no place to safely be but the Lambo. That was the one thing that felt like it worked for me.”

He visited the ghost towns and big cities and retraced childhood trips. As soon as he’d settle down somewhere he’d get the itch to move and pack up to drive somewhere else. He had trouble paying for the house in Dallas — his one remaining possession he couldn’t shake — and was burning through what cash he had to afford gas. He almost lost the house numerous times.

“I have a few hundred grand against me, I don’t like debt, but I’m used to it,” Richard says. “I’ve accumulated a lot and paid it back several times in my life.”

His wanderings yielded as much joy and humor as they did introspection and isolation, including a trip to strip club in Ohio where Richard, then 32, was mistaken for Moby by an a waitress who was convinced he was the musician because of his shaved head, glasses and fancy car.

“This girl comes up and was a waitress and she’s like ‘You’re Moby, aren’t you?’ and I said ‘I’ll be anyone you want me to be,’ and she took it as ‘I’m Moby.'”

Richard is not Moby, but he’s also not completely against accepting free bottles of champagne when offered.

“It was just ridiculous, the manager’s like kissing my butt, I maybe spent $100 the whole night and it was just really, really silly and absurd.”

“It was just like The Blues Brothers!”

I Sold Everything To Buy A Lamborghini And Drive Across The Country

Driving across the country in a Lamborghini means occasionally driving above the speed limit. Richard’s honest about his desire to go fast and has a drawer full of 53 tickets to prove it. But it wasn’t speed, exactly, that landed him in the handcuffs of an Indiana State Trooper.

Though generally jumping from hotel room to hotel room, Richard did have family responsibilities like serving as the best man in his cousin’s wedding. While en route to the wedding he was stopped for speeding but ran afoul of the Indiana State Police and suddenly found himself staring down the highway at a roadblock.

Because his car’s registration was one-day expired the troops were able to search the car and found a handgun.

“I don’t travel without guns, I’ve been in too many situations so I always carry one or two guns with me,” Richard says. “A car like that is an assault on the senses, and you could be in a decent area and just be barraged by people and you never knew who you’re dealing with.”

At first he didn’t grasp the gravity of the situation — the police thought he was moving drugs — so his calm demeanor and jokes about hating the town he was in and a general Blues Brothers schtick didn’t go over well. They kept him in the back of a squad car for four hours, eventually releasing him on his own recognizance when they realized they weren’t able to drive the car on the back of a flatbed without his help.

He eventually got the car back and the charges settled, but the whole endeavor cost him $25,000 in fines, travel, and legal fees.


Most people don’t use their expensive cars as daily drivers exactly because they’re so expensive. The highest mileage of any Lamborghini Gallardo for sale on eBay Motors is 38,835 for a 2004 model, but the majority of vehicles are below 10,000 miles.

In his trips across the country Richard managed 91,807 miles.

“I can’t afford to buy something like that and drive it on the weekend,” Richard explains. “The difference between being materialistic and not is when you use what you have.”

For him, it’s a better value to drive it given the immediate drop in value for a used Lamborghini. It’s even strange for him that others think otherwise.

“No one is concerned with anything as long as Starbucks and the mall is open. It baffles me. It overwhelms me actually. You can have something that’s as extreme as a Lamborghini — that’s perfect in a sense — and it has no value once you use it.”

All that driving does have a price and now the car has even less value. After all the hard driving and long miles, the timing chain stretched, crunching the valves and turning the car into an exotic and expensive paperweight. The car is now worth less than he owes on it and the bank refuses to grant him another loan.

“For me, it’s wasteful not to use it. That’s anything. It doesn’t matter if it’s a fucking dishwasher,” says Richard. “That’s not really socially acceptable. It’s not the way we’re programmed… most people don’t live like I do. I’d eat ramen noodles to pay for gasoline, just to avoid the monotony of being stuck in four walls.”

Considering the traumatic experience that led him to buy the car, its destruction doesn’t seem to burden him too much.

“It worked everyday, it worked like it was supposed to, it never broke down,” Richard assures me. “It exceeded all my expectations.”

He’s using his sudden lack of transportation not as the end of one journey but as the start of a new one, setting up a shop in Dallas where he plans to build custom motorcycles and superbikes. He has plans to repair the engine or swap in a new one once he can afford it, but for now it makes an interesting sculpture to show friends and prospective customers in the main room of his new office. Richard’s also met a girl, but he’s trying to take it one step at a time.

His Lamborghini may no longer run, but Richard doesn’t regret the decisions he’s made. He adopts a zen-like tone that clashes with his mohawk while explaining how lucky he was to be able to leave everything behind and experience something many fantasize about but almost no one has the balls to actually do.

“You’re never going to live up to anyone’s expectations, so you might as well live up to your own and for me that’s to be as free as you can. And if money doesn’t buy you freedom then it’s useless.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Teaser Alert: They got arrested!

They were one of the highlights of the World Cup so far with their gorgeous looks and orange mini-dresses.

But while armchair viewers admired the 36 gorgeous Dutch girls supporting their team against Denmark, the World Cup organisers were rather more suspicious.

And when the half-time whistle blew they moved in and gave all 36 the red card after it was revealed they were part of an elaborate piece of ‘ambush marketing’ by the Dutch beer company Bavaria who are not official sponsors at the tournament.

Sea of orange: The Dutch 'football fans' pose for photographs clutching flags before the Holland vs. Denmark game. They were thrown out at half-time after it was revealed they were part of a beer marketing campaign

Too good to be true: The gorgeous crowd of girls all appeared to be transfixed by the match

It was every male football fan’s dream as the stunning army of Dutch supporters cheered from the stands at Johannesburg’s Soccer City stadium as Holland played in their first game of the tournament.

But now a full investigation has been launched with World Cup pundit Robbie Earle axed by ITV today after tickets for matches in South Africa were found to have been used for ‘unauthorised purposes’.

The broadcaster said a ‘substantial number’ of tickets, which were for Earle’s friends and family, had been passed to a ‘third party’. The incident relates to the Bavaria beer stunt.

Meanwhile there were plenty of genuine Holland fans dressed up in orange, some as air crews, to provide the colour for the second half. But it wasn’t quite the same…

Red card: The Dutch 'fan club' are ejected from the match at half-time by a Fifa official

Air we go: Some of the genuine Dutch fans dressed up as stewardesses and pilots for the game

Click on this image to view a hilarious come-back from all men to women worldwide.

Legal expert says Perez could face federal charges…could be career “suicide”.

We know: when it comes to celebrity gossip, there have to be limits. Perez Hilton could face super-serious charges for ignoring one of those limits by tweeting a photo of Miley Cyrus climbing out of a car without
underwear this week. You won’t believe how insane this is.

Earlier this week Perez Hilton reportedly tweeted a photo of 17-year-old Miley Cyrus climbing out of a vehicle and wearing a dress but no underwear. Perez warned: “If you are easily offended, do NOT click here … Oh, Miley! Warning: truly not for the easily offended!”

But the warning was not enough. The fact that Perez published the photo could bring a super-damper on his career. Perez Hilton has said that he gets over 8 million pageviews in a normal day, and there are many media companies who have sought to buy him out — but this latest Miley move could very realistically be the end of Perez Hilton’s celebrity blogging days.

Says L.A.-based attorney Jeffrey Douglas, a child pornography case specialist: “We’re not talking about a misdemeanor. You don’t have to know what the definition of the law is, all you have to do is knowingly distribute the photograph.” Douglas also called Perez’s move “suicidal” to his career.

Salon also reported that Perez Hilton “could be prosecuted on the state or federal level — or both — with a conviction potentially resulting in a 15 year sentence and lifetime registration as a sex offender.”

PopEater has more, including the fact that neither Miley Cyrus nor Perez Hilton has commented on the shot (Perez has taken down his incriminating tweet, but apparently other sites picked up the photo of Miley). Monday a clearly red-faced Perez tweeted a link to a video in which he insisted that he and Miley are “cool” and that he just likes to “lovingly taunt” her.

I don’t know about you but I’d like to take a vuvuzela and smack someone upside the head with it. They are so annoying that BBC is considering a buzz-free broadcast of future games. We get it — you like blowing things. Now stop.

Or perhaps we can chip in and get all these chicks and their friends scattered throughout the stadium to distract these horny guys. See what I did there? Heh heh But how to get them to stop? How about more hottie soccer fans like this one?

This, my friends (no hard feelings) is too big for you.

A survey of more than 1,000 men in India has concluded that condoms made according to international sizes are too large for a majority of Indian men.

The study found that more than half of the men measured had penises that were shorter than international standards for condoms.

It has led to a call for condoms of mixed sizes to be made more widely available in India.

The two-year study was carried out by the Indian Council of Medical Research.

Over 1,200 volunteers from the length and breadth of the country had their penises measured precisely, down to the last millimetre.

The scientists even checked their sample was representative of India as a whole in terms of class, religion and urban and rural dwellers.

” It’s not size, it’s what you do with it that matters” – Sunil Mehra

The conclusion of all this scientific endeavour is that about 60% of Indian men have penises which are between three and five centimetres shorter than international standards used in condom manufacture.

Doctor Chander Puri, a specialist in reproductive health at the Indian Council of Medical Research, told the BBC there was an obvious need in India for custom-made condoms, as most of those currently on sale are too large.

The issue is serious because about one in every five times a condom is used in India it either falls off or tears, an extremely high failure rate.

And the country already has the highest number of HIV infections of any nation.

‘Not a problem’

Mr Puri said that since Indians would be embarrassed about going to a chemist to ask for smaller condoms there should be vending machines dispensing different sizes all around the country.

“Smaller condoms are on sale in India. But there is a lack of awareness that different sizes are available. There is anxiety talking about the issue. And normally one feels shy to go to a chemist’s shop and ask for a smaller size condom.”

But Indian men need not be concerned about measuring up internationally according to Sunil Mehra, the former editor of the Indian version of the men’s magazine Maxim.

“It’s not size, it’s what you do with it that matters,” he said.

“From our population, the evidence is Indians are doing pretty well.

“With apologies to the poet Alexander Pope, you could say, for inches and centimetres, let fools contend.”

Watch the spectacular video here.

Dubai on Monday officially inaugurated the centerpiece of its decade-long construction boom, with the surprise revelation that the world-beating 168-story skyscraper — seen by some as a symbol of the city’s economic excess — was even bigger than previously thought.

In a glitzy firework-lit ceremony, the city-state’s ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum unveiled a plaque commemorating the event and also announced that the $1.5 billion structure has a new name: the Burj Khalifa.

Named after Khalifa Bin Zayed, the president of the United Arab Emirates — and ruler of Abu Dhabi, which recently bailed out debt-ridden Dubai to the tune of $10 billion — the tower was officially recorded as 828 meters tall, adding 10 meters on to previous height claims.

Six years in the making, and now 319 meters higher than previous skyscraping record-holder Taipei 101, Dubai’s newest edifice commands dizzying views of the ambitious building program that has transformed the emirate.

The structure’s architects, Chicago-based Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, have called the Burj Khalifa “a bold global icon that will serve as a model for future urban centers.”

Declaring that “tall buildings are back,” the company predicts that the groundbreaking techniques it used to push the Burj Khalifa to new heights should enable the construction of even taller towers in the future.

iReport: Share your photos of the world’s tallest buildings

“As with any project, SOM’s architects and engineers learned a great deal and are ready to apply this to the next world’s tallest building as it is certainly possible to go taller,” it said.

CNN – Despite such lofty claims, the Burj Khalifa — and other construction projects including the Palm Jumeirah and World archipelagos of man-made islands built for the super-rich — have cast a financial shadow over Dubai.

Last year the emirate shocked investors by asking for a freeze on payments owed on its $26 billion in debts.

The announcement by Dubai World — an umbrella group which includes the Burj Khalifa’s developers –delivered a cold dose of reality to speculators worldwide who believed the oil-rich region was impervious to the global financial crisis.

Facts and figures: Why Dubai is looking up

While predicted economic recovery are likely to help Dubai to shake off some of its debt woes, if not fully regain its boom-time ebullience, some say the city’s path of prestige over practicality will leave projects like the Burj Khalifa struggling to justify their place in the Gulf state’s skyline.

“Dubai doesn’t really need to have to build tall asides from prestige purposes,” Jim Krane, author of “City of Gold: Dubai and the Dream of Capitalism” told CNN in a recent interview.

“If you look at it, it’s a really bad idea. It uses as much electricity as an entire city. And every time the toilet is flushed they’ve got to pump water half a mile into the sky,” he said.

The telescopic shape also presents problems of a more practical nature Krane says.

“The upper 30 or 40 floors are so tiny that they’re useless, so they can’t use them for anything else apart from storage. They’ve built a small, not so useful storage warehouse half a mile in the sky,” he said.